The Safety Management Show
The Safety Management Show

Episode 12 · 2 weeks ago

Risk Assessment: Why a Safety SME Initiative Is a Gamechanger w/ Darrin Anderson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Risk assessments are absolutely integral to implementing safety at the workplace. Simply put, risk assessments are when you analyze your next series of steps in order to evaluate the safest course of action to address the task at hand.

So, how can you develop a suite of risk assessment and mitigation procedures and implement them at your workplace?

In this episode, Darrin Anderson , Environmental Health, Safety, and Security Manager at Nesher Pharmaceuticals (USA) LLC , shares his advice for building effective risk identification assessments and procedures.

We discuss:

- Risk identification assessments and procedures

- The power of safety SMEs

- The danger of safety being an afterthought

- How technology and ergonomics have changed safety

Hear more stories from safety professionals by subscribing in Apple Podcasts , Spotify, or visiting our website .

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for The Safety Management Show in your favorite podcast player.

You're listening to the SafetyManagement Show where safety professionals share engaging storiesabout their time in the trenches and the hard earned lessons they've learnedalong the way, let's dig in a good morning and welcome to the safetymanagement show. Today I have our guest Darren Anderson. He is theenvironmental, health, safety and security for NASARA UTICAS. He has aninteresting background. I think you guys are really going to love hearingfrom him today. It's got some military, some NATO things which I just think isamazing and quite a diversified background when it comes to health andsafety so good morning, daren welcome good morning. How are you today I'mfantastic? Thank you. So much for joining US super excited to have youwell, I'm excited as well, thanks for the invitation and and for reaching outit's. This is an exciting, exciting moment, Nice. So I'm so glad you'rehere. So you know a little bit about your background. You develop someemergency response for civil disturbance, natural disasters andmilitary engagement over in coastable, which is you know not. Everybody cansay that they were part of NATO project. You know to instill peace and harmonyin another country, so Kudos to you for that they that was a pretty funendeavor. So I bet it was, and I know you know we talked a little bit abouthow that kind of jump started. You know your risk assessment background and howyou know you had to take your military background. Also added to that so to usa little bit about Risk Assessment and your view on it. Well, risk assessmentis, to put it simply: it's analyzing, your next step or the next series ofsteps evaluating the safest, mechanical or environmental weight in order toaddress your task at hand. In other words, if you're going to climb aladder, you want to look at the train. You want to look at the surface. Youwant to give the ladder you want to have a plan in place before you go toidentify those areas that that could be a little a little dangerous and theneither avoid them, which would be the primary choice or mitigate them untilyou've lowered that risk down to a very safe level, and that can be done inalmost every circumstance until you get into the really really dangerous eventssuch as you know, fire fighting, but then there are risk mitigations thatare put in place to make it safer to enter that building, to try and rescuepeople and put out a fighter. So even there in a high risk environment, thereare mitigations that can be applied just by understanding your environmentand what you have to do to move with an awesome. You know, and- and we'vetalked a little bit previously- you know about your take on risk assessmentand you know breaking down the different tasks. Specifically, one ofthe things that we discussed is your involvement in the military and howit's not. You know like we see in the movies where you know they say: Ohwe're going to go and do this mission and everybody just you know, grabs ourstuff and runs so tell us a little bit about your involvement in that and howit really breaks down and can be used across any sector, certainly so inevery single task that you do in the military, in peace, time and trainingin community efforts and also in more time there, you have to do a riskassessment. So you have to look at your task at hand. What you're supposed todo when you're supposed to do it? How you're supposed to do it and evaluateevery stage every risk along the way? In fact, every task, for instance, in atraining environment if you're going to a ripe range well rifle range: HasFifteen subtasks getting people on the range getting people off the range, theactual shooting on the range, the loading, the unloading? How do you makecertain that their rifles being cleared they're several steps, so every singleone of those steps has to be evaluated for risk and you put in measures ofaction which mitigate the risk. You lower the risk at every level. So whenit's compiled into your overall Risk Assessment, you've identified everyrisk step by staff and mitigated those that's before you ever start. That doesinclude the getting people from point a to point B to the rifle range orgetting the ammunition. And how do you get it there? How you get it safe sowith the military? Every single task for the year is subdivided like that,and risk assessments are completed for every single one of them. So when youput a plan together, the people know exactly based upon the SOPs that are inplace in any mitigation, so they have. There already tops the trainingstandards that are there, but then you've put in your mitigations. Forthat specific event, and you place people in charge, you give people theAuthority to make adjustments in the field in order to make it safer if theyrecognize something that hadn't been pre, planned for or or a situationchanges. And now you have a new risk and you do that by giving thosee peoplein the field at the lowest level, the...

...ability to understand and identifyrisks and to look at that task takes just a few seconds to look at the taskand to decide the safest way to approach it and and that's how it'sapplied in the military. We started doing that in the S and really changedit in the S, and it ended his significantly lowered the injury anddeath rates in both training and in active duty, an involvement. That'sreally amazing, you know you don't think about it. In those terms a mostof us, you know civilian, stone, anyways. You know- and I think I reallyenjoy speaking with you, because you know one of the things that you've doneis you know you developed risk identification, assessment andmitigation procedures for the company that you're with now Kudos. You are yousaved about twelve million dollars a year on your workman's camp, not asmall task at all. We know that you know the injuries that people face onthe workplace really drives up the cost right when it comes from a business,scampit safety, the insurances things of that nature. What are some of thethings that you brought in to those identification assessments andprocedures that you'd like to share? Well yeah, one of the things in thiswas with a previous company, but we were able to take the software whichran their job tasks. In other words, they would get their orders and theyworked in the field typically and either a business or person's residence,and they would have their job tests that told them what tasks they weregoing to do were they. It was a communications company, so were theygoing to input digital video, or was it going to be digital for internet or orany of those pets? So we embedded. If this, then I workedwith a data team and we developed if this then protocols for every one ofthe steps. So there are inherently some risk, some behaviors within that job,task that having a higher inherent risk so, for instance, getting on a ladderwhen they would get to the point where they would have to get on the ladder intheir job task. Then they would get a series of quick questions that wasdesigned to only take three to six seconds. But if they answered one thenit would prompt them to a very specific next question. So, for instance, do youneed to use the latter es or no? Yes, oh well, which latter and they wouldhave to look assess their situation and determine which latter and then whichterrain? Because it's going to determine whether you're putting outcleats or not fleets and how you're going to bind and secure that at thebase and each one of those questions. Then Fed to a specific next questionand when they were finished, they gave them a paragraph remind them in orderhow to more safely proceed so within three to six seconds. They have to lookat that environment and they had to make a true evaluation based upon thequestion that was given. So we were able to embed that and every one of thework orders for people in multiple different skill sets of which allowedthem to perform those simple riskidentification assessments just a few seconds at a time before they went onto each of the tasks and that's what that helped. That was one of the bigthings and the other big thing was creating safety, Smeet, teens safety,smees and teams, and that has been where I'm at now the biggest success.We took individuals who are interested in safety and individuals at everylevel of responsibility in the company and train them as a safety SMEE, orthey got extra training in safe behaviors and risk identification andrisk communigation, and it wasn't just about checking a block or answering aquestion. It was about looking at the behaviors and looking at the job asyou're, going through every step that you do, even if you do it a hundredtimes a day and re evaluating it every and it takes only a second butdeveloping those skill sets and then giving the people on their team andother teams that work in the same area the ability to contact them directlywhen they have a question or those folks have the ability to stop andcoach someone say: Hey, you know. If you do it this way, then you're notexposing yourself to this risk and working together as a team. It empowersthat gives them the ability to help each other. They have a question theyreach out the Meta or anybody on the HST, and it also allows us to make itpart of the everyday process, rather than a block that you have tocheck. It becomes part of their everydayemotion. That's awesome, you know the Puri to peer of support and sharing.You know that we previously discussed- and I like the idea at your companywith the ownership of safety roles. So you know tell us a little bit aboutthat and you knoww how you feel it's...

...impacted a safety as far as yourorganization goes well, I think when you give individuals ownership and yougive them the support, you can't just say: Hey you own it and run away. So you give them the support. You cancontinue training. You spend time with them. you go out on the floor possibleand and spend time with them and watch them and and encourage in coach and letthem have that ownership and they understandit's not about checking a block. It's not about an extra step, or sometimesit's about removing extra steps in order to make it more streamlined in asmoother flow and to reduce the risk between one point and another.Sometimes it is reduction and steps, but if you give them that ownership andgive them that support, then it becomes not about doing the safety guy stuffyou know or or doing, or we have to check the block because that's part ofour process now it becomes hey. How can we take care of each other and theybegin to recognize? Taking care of each other- and I gay Man Watch that Oh yeahthanks, I didn't see that and then you start to see where it becomes a teameffort getting through the process doing theirnormal daily work, but doing it while watching out for the other individual,and it becomes not about applying the rules but applying concept of I to gohome healthy at the end of the day you know and and being healthy, whileyou're doing it yeah it's so you know refreshing to see that being more intoorganizations. I know I'm personally taking some ocean training right nowand I've noticed things similar to that and when they give you examples of thedifferent risks in different areas of say right. So you know I recently didsome fall pro and some water safety and things of that nature. You knowscaffolding and I just moved on to cranes which is like who cranes andsilk. It does scare me because there's a lot of information to know there too,but you know the in the modules they really, you know said hey if you're inthis situation- and you see somebody doing this, how would you react to that? What wouldyou say to them? And I think it's really great- that your company isdoing that and that it's a supportive environment when it comes to safety,you know making sure everybody your neighbor gets home safe at night, yourco worker, you know, because we spend so much time with the people on ourteams, and you know most of us spend a lot more time at work than we do. Youknow at home. Unfortunately, so there are our family, for you know most ofthe time and we need to take care of them. One of the things that I noticedyou know that we had talked about was something that you passionatelydisagree with, which was that safety's an afterthought. So tell me, I talk tome a little bit about what that looks like for you. Well, when safety is anafterthought, you find that people will take short cuts in hot consider. Theirnext step, they're only focused on what they're doing now and it's just okayI'll go back and I'll check the block, and I won't consider that and it putsthem in an unknown risk. I mean nobody willingly walks into the or rarely dopeople willingly walk into traffic. We get in injuries because we're notconsidering a possible risk of something we might we we don't considersomething other than what we're doing. So, when people take the idea thatsafety's and afterthought or it's an ad on or it's just another block, I haveto check and I'll take care of it when it's time to do that, every quarter welose the idea that safety is simply about doing what we do every day anddoing it in such a way that we get to go home and be healthy for our familyand that we get to take care of our family. So I think we often misplacethe idea of safety being applied for the idea that safety is just aqualification that you have to get yeah. Absolutely a hundred percent cracked onthat, and you know I like the way that you look at the. Why of the mechanicsright, so it doesn't. Do us any good to just say: okay, you need to do thisthis and this. If you explain to someone why they need to do it in aparticular manner and what the hazards are. It really seems to make adifference, and I know that something that you know you've experienced in thepast and and that you think a lot of people maybe need to head in thatdirection and when it comes to explaining safety, I think if, whenyou're working with folks for safety, you ask a lot of questions. You don'tjust you, don't just throw the the answers out there and you don't certainly aren't going to get anywherewith death by powerpoint yeah to get hands on. You have to spend time withfolks and when you do ask them well. Why did you decide it that way? Why didyou decide to do it that way? What would be a way? What would be a riskthat could happen if you did that? Well, this could happen well, O. How can youavoid that? Well, you know, and you...

...work with folks and have them start tothink through those things then run and getting their safety glasses. It's nota hassle. It's Oh wait a minute. You know I only get two eyes and you knowsomething happens. Then I only have one o. You can't go to the store and getanother, so they start to realize that Oh, it's a simple step, but it stopsthe enormous risk of getting something in my eye or or damaging my eye ordamaging my vision, and can I continue this job? If, if I do lose myperipheral vision, there are some jobs that you just can't do that with soyeah oftentimes, just spending that time with people and asking them a lotof questions, one of the great things about creating the safety sneezes isthat whole process is teaching them. How to ask the right questions as wellas what questions to ask and what questions to answer, and you know thepolicies and they go through and work with everyone. Our Safety SMEES givethe safety greeting in the morning when we do our daily operations, meaningbefore we start they're the ones that give the briefing and it's not justokay. We got to look out for this watch your ice and wash for ice and snow inthe winter. It's they're, given the freedom to share hey best practices.This question came up yesterday in the field, and this is how we resolved it,or this happened, and this person did this to avoid that and they recognizeit or this came up yesterday, so make sure you guys are preparing andconsidering that, thankfully, no one got injured, but this could have been areal risk and they're, given that freedom and were given the freedom toyou know reward others in front of each other. Hey. This person made a reallygood decision yesterday by doing this when they encountered this this risk oror this problem, and they resolved it this way. So when it becomes active andit becomes a living active part of their decision making and it's nolonger just about getting the nine questions ride or the twelve questionsright yeah, I love the whole. You know safety as a conversation. You know it'snot just you know, standing in front of people and saying okay well, this youneed to do this this and this. What? If you did it this way? And I really enjoythe way- and I, like a concept of you, know safety being a conversationbetween people and not a demand or a rule, even though they are, you know weneed to have them in place to protect our employees, but you know justgetting them more involved in their own safety and the safety of out others.You know through impersonating that goes back and forth, or even zoomtraining that goes back and forth right, so you're having a conversation aboutsafety. It's not you know one person standing up in front. You know saying:okay, here's a little chart we're going to do this. Is it this today and it'smore interactive? And I think that holds true for us. You know as olderadults as adults in general, we tend to learn a little bit differently and itso you know I mean hey. I know it's been many decades since I was in school,but you know I still do active learning now and I find that I tend to get alittle more out of you know a live training so to speak like somethinglike a zoom meeting or in person training. You know, then I dofrom just you know, watching a module on a screen. You know one of the thingswe did with ergonomics in multiple locations was, we did Skiba Zoom,wasn't really big, then it was bothe years ago, but we had the remote location set upthe same exercise platform that we set up in in one location we went throughwith that all of the remote locations. Everybody got together in theirdifferent training cycles and we all talked about the right type ofwarehouse or Conomico, and then we all perform it together and we pretis eachother and we assisted each other. Well, you know, if you know I found if I liftmy chin, then my shoulders go back and I stand a little straighter when I'mlifting with my legs and they're doing that with each other, and it became avirtual classroom environment. The only logistics was setting up exactly thesame series of boxes and palates in the same fashion at all of the remotelocations and that turned out to be extremely beneficial. Folks then usethat same concept and did that with other other shifts and other tasks andwhen they were redoing their training classes. They incorporated some ofthose hands on in their training classes. So it worked out really wellin that we were able to have that immediate feedback, and it wasparticipatory. It wasn't just you weren't, just sitting back and tryingto worry about how long this is going to go on, because you have severalthings that they care of you know it actually put people in place of doingwhat they need to do and understanding. Why, and if you tell people whyoftentimes it's the? Why that people,...

...don't you know the? Why makes a bigdifference? You'd mentioned it earlier? Why do we do it this way? You know whydo we do? Why do we take a ladder off Iraq? This way why, when we put aladder up, do we make sure it's between seventy three and a half and seventyfive degrees? You know: What can what tools can we use? In fact it was bytalking with folks and working with floats. You get some phenomenal ideasout of individuals that may not be in a traditional safety role. For instance,when I first learned of the Nayas ladder safety APP, it was not from asafety meeting or a safety flog or or even a meeting with Dias. It was fromone of the technicians whose brother was a roofer and they were using it,and he showed me and the the atmosferics you open. You set yourladder off, you open the APP you put it on the center dial button. Literally,you hold it against the legs and it tells you exactly where you need to be.It gives you a vibration, tone alarm and a colored visual image of where youneed to be to get it at that. Seventy three and a half to seventy five degreeright and then you flip it over and it automatically makes an adjustment forthe horizonal balance and it does exactly the same thing so you're ablethen to mount that ladder, knowing that your center of gravity is directly overevery step, it's not in front and not behind, because you're within that oneand a half degree range that you should be just the application of that reducedlatter slippage or ladder falls or latter ladder incidents in which thelatter moved, because it was inappropriately placed reduced that byeighteen percent within four months. Now, that's significant. We were allthe way down to two percent within four months and that carried on we were twopercent was our highest over the next year for lander placement, a simpletool quite literally takes just a few seconds, but that did that wasn't some greatgrand idea that anyone from the AHS team had it was a guy saying: Hey, haveyou seen this? You know because they were engaged, that's cal because theyknew hey this works, and this is a great thing and- and I'm engaged now,I'm doing something with I a d and then, of course they got you give them asafety ward and you let people know about stuff like that, and it helpscreate an atmosphere where everyone realizes that they're valuable not onlyto the company for what money they can bring to it, but their value well, justsimply as a person and a team member and then they start to see other peoplethat same way. It's not just a punch, the clock and get out of there. So sothere's the company pay off as well, not just saving money in workmen's kindof or saving money, and you know, equipment, breakage or or downtime,because something has now has to be cleaned. We had a hazard, its spell orsomething like that, but it's beneficial to the company environmentand the company health, and that people are engaged with each other in apositive manner, keeping each other safe as as they're doing the productionfor whatever company that you have yeah. It's so interesting that someone, youknow that wasn't essentially a safety person that brought that to you andthat kind of we've talked a little bit about different technology right, andthat seems to be the direction that I see a lot of companies. You know youryour local, you know AC guy and your field worker are now you know gettingtablets and everything's becoming more digital on their work, orders andthings of that nature, but I'm starting to see a trend in technology. You know,of course, the pandemic produced a lot of that with the need for zoom and allof our meetings and and nobody can get together, and you know all of this, soyou know it's kind of relief that we can get back together now, but I thinkit really made people brain storm on the future of technology when it comesto a field like safety. What are you seeing for trends when it comes totechnology and safety? Oh yeah, absolutely one of the things that Ilike we were able to do it. The last place and able to do at this place is,is to take technology and put safety policies and then what what I call justthen yet little safety, one or two minute, quick safety brief and createhyperlinks within the text of their work orders. So if they have to work on an elevated platform thathappyland sits there and if they need to look at it to get a refresher, theyjust hit that, and it brings up that that one or two minutes then yet, whereyou walk through that quick process or they want to look at the policy, theycan hit that that button and that'll take them to a main page where thepolicies are all stored. So was able to do that at the last place. Working onthat at this at this company. Sometimes our folks don't have the technology atan so we're making it in some central...

...locations where they can. You know,step off the line and walk back, maybe stop what they're doing for a minute orwait till the break, because it's something that's coming up after theirbreak and they just walk over and get that refresher before they go on andthe fact that people are reminding each other you're going to be doing that.Have you looked at this, or I did this yesterday, and this worked really welland is an encouraging factor when I'm out on the floor- and I see that and Iget that from other folks as well, that are come up to me and say: Hey thisperson had a great idea and then we look at that. We look at our behaviors.We see whether or not their idea can work and we've made some adjustmentswith some of our processes and blending. Because of that which has beenwonderful because now they have ownership they get by in and theirvoice is heard, and it's not just a matter of you. Take it to this guy orthis or this lady and and the two of them decide whether or not they thinkit's good and they're, not the one out on the floor every day, doing that orthey're, not the one out in the field going to to that person's house or forwhatever job it is. You know, t give those people that ability to make thosethose assessments and have those great ideas and bring them to you istremendous shouldn't. Be In a little box, if you're in a VAT, then it's notworking the way. It's opposed to. It's supposed to keep people say, save thecompany money, not just in payouts for people and injuries, but in breakageand down time and all those other things all of that's part of safety,and if it's not a central part of your focus when you're starting your nextpast, inherently it's riskier than it would be. If you take in one second,quite literally seconds, we spend that long, just pausing between movements inthat pause between movements, you can make that assessment. It just has tobecome a habit. It has to be something that that we develop it's a skill. Wehave to develop yeah, it's interesting, you know how more companies are areputting that into the initial training and orientation, particularly when itcomes to manufacturing of any type of product. You know my roommate works formajor consumer goods company that has a plant here in Phoenix, and you know she was telling me when shewent through her initial training about how they were said. You know we need towhen you're doing this job. You need to stand in this particular manner and andturn this way and not you know just don't just pivot at the waste and it'sinteresting to see now how more manufacturing companies are reallylooking at. You know: Erconomy S, a D and the risk assessment when it comesto how their employees are moving and working. Have you seen that assomething that that your company is developing more in their safety program?Yes, actually, we've been re, evaluating everything and gettingindividuals who are on the line, who are actually doing the repetitivemotions who are doing that involved in that assessment, so, rather than justone person going and watching who's in Ergonomics, trained expert, getting theothers involved and and then making it collaborated effort- and here when wedo, are what we call in our new employee orientation training. We spendmore than twenty percent on safety and safe behaviors of that, depending on the job classification.The minimum is twenty, it can be as high as thirty percent of their fulltraining is and how to safely do their job, which is significant. There are alot of places where you know you just read a couple of SOPs and you movealong and we've incorporated as part of our new employee orientation in eachstep of the process, so that when people so that we can makecertain that especially somebody, that's new is learning the right habitsto help them make better decisions and as they move throughout their thetransition from one task to another and as they're doing specific tasks yeah.It's I find it's so refreshing that companies are starting to build thatinto their training programs when they're on boarding new people, becauseone I think that it allows the employee to have some ownership of what they'redoing and how they do their job. It shows that the company's management hasa Byan when it comes to safety. Biggest problem I see throughout companies is,you know, trying to get upper managements approval and when it comesto implementing, I don't want to say new, because a lot of the a lot of thetechniques aren't bran new but they're new to them. So you know, I think,that's great, that that you guys implement you, the twenty to thirty percent when it comes to your new employee...

...orientation and I'm finding that a lotof major companies are starting to do that. They've learned through the pastthat safety really is important. You know it's not something we do just toget Osha off our backs. You know it's not something we do to lower overhead,but it's an intricate part of what we do to keep our workplace safe and ouremployees healthy. You know and that they are the longevity, especially whenyou have people that are doing you know there repetitive motions like in amanufacturing situation, or even you know some types of construction. Youknow you got roofers that are just hammering away, and you know they'vegot that they're moving the hammer in the same way all day long, and so youknow, I think it's so important so nice that companies are starting to buildthat into their programs right away when they're bringing people in so. Doyou find that doing that has made a significant difference to the safetyculture there where you are yeah, I think so. I think when, when we make it part of the not just theprocess of what you're doing every day, but you give those team members thefreedom to take care of each other and make suggestions and and to reach outto each other to others who have been trained appropriately trained with withextra training. It changes the way they approach when they walk on the line orwhen they're working in the warehouse or when they're having to do eventhough very repetitive actions. It changes the way they do it and the waythey look at it they're more aware of not only their mechanics but they'remechanics in relation to their task and in relation to the other environmentaround them. They're not just worried about their little station they'reworried about the other individuals, so I find, or I shouldn't say, worried,but there's a concern and a thought process in which that other person isevaluated in their evaluation of how they're going to do this. It takes alittle while for people to get used to it and comfortable and able to do itfrequently so being there. You know to use a biomechanics term to get that musclememory so being there to encourage and to train and to ask the questions,helps them develop that because, if they just if they're told one timethey'll do it for about a week and then they they'll forget again, becausetheir other habit was to not be involved with that or do not thinkincorporate that. I think a that's the challenges to get everyone to developthat as a pattern of habit. That's why that I with by putting it in their workorder process that allowed they were, they were making those decisions allday long and they were doing it as they were, making they were making thoseidentifications and they couldn't go forward to the next step with their jobtask without it. So it helped develop that in which they had already mademost of those assessments before they ever started their job when they pulledup, which is really what you want and then, as they start that next task,they reevaluate it momentarily and does it does it stay the same? Does it godown just to go up and risk give him? What do I have to do to make thatchange? I think the hardest part that I've seen you were talking about with seniorstaff in ten. Your leadership is to help them understand that safety isn'tjust something that costs them money and it doesn't just save them. Money inwork in lower workmens cooperates for the lower environmental hazard rates, but that it changes the atmosphere andthe culture of their business and people who are empowered and have theability to help each other and to tend to not only take care of each other,but they do a better job in production and performance and they tend to staylonger because they're being taken care of, they believe they're reading takingcare of by the company, because the company truly values that that personas an individual, not just as a worker, being yeah. It's interesting. You knowwith the habits and how companies take care of their employees right. So everymorning I just moved, but before I moved, I had to drive through the cityof Phoenix to get out here to tempe yeah every morning. It is a lot oftraffic, but it's interesting because I would see a different work. Crews. Youknow starting their day, so there's one national construction company. Thatdoes a lot of I'm not sure if it's utility work, but I think that it isunderground or you know it's where the roads are all phoenix. All the roadsare all tore up all the time, because they're always doing something, but itwas interesting because I see this one crew, I actually see them in differentlocation, so it's the same company with different crews that I see throughoutmy way to work and every morning a at...

...the same time, because I have my littlepattern on my way to work. Unless traffic gets too bad, as is an accident,you know they're out there doing like stretches and exercises before theystart their day and it's first I was like what are they doingover there and then, and then I saw it. You know and they're doing their armexercises and you know just stretching for the day and ironically, you know, Isee other crews that don't do that and they seem a little. I don't know I wantto say sleepy in the morning right everybody's got their cup of coffee andthey're just kind of hanging around the equipment, but these guys are up anddoing stuff and I'm going by at five five thirty in the morning. So you knowfor them to be that active was impressive. But what really struck meis that, at the end of the day, you know three thirty four o'clock, whenI'm traveling back through the city to go home, they're still working and they seem to be working asvigorously as they were in the morning, and so I was so curious. You know howthat incorporates in you know their daily mentality andtheir rigorousness to do their job and to continue to do it in the same manner.Throughout the day you know, do you find that incorporating some of thesehabits got one that I mentioned, but I'm sure you have other ones in yourcompany. You know that people do on a daily basis that it really impactssomeone's attitude towards doing their work and getting it done as well in themorning as it is in the afternoon. Yes, I think so I think first you're givingthem the opportunity to pause and take care of themselves andto stretch in their into warm up those muscles before they jump on the lineand they're not or for your instance. You know working on the highway crewand I get it. You Re, you guys are like four feet from the sun out there, it soI'm sure you're always melt past, but so they're always working on it, butbut yeah it not only warms them up and makes it a safer makes her theirmechanics the round mechanics safer to go into that by giving them appropriatebrights throughout the day and adjusting for the environment, the heatand the humidity. As those things go through the roof. Where I live, we getpretty hot summers. You know we're in the high is to the to the low one.Hundreds for about three weeks is typically at three to four weeks. Soit's not terrible. However, a low humidity dayhere is about seventy percent. Oh Wow, and we can have yesterday was it was ninety six degreeswith a ninety three percent humidity, so heat index of a hundred and seven.So you know that gets hot in a a friend of mine who came out from the WestCoast said, I feel like I'm drinking your air, so we have to pay the host.We have to make those adjustments for individuals and giving them a chance tostep back a rest and re stretch or relax in adjustments to the temperature.Also lets them know that we're not only caring for them, but they'll, makefewer mistakes and they'll be more consistent in their production on aproduction side that five minute pause to. Let everyone rehydrate let everyoneat that may not have been in their three hour. Section they'll come backand their production will be better if you're making those appropriateadjustments. Now, if it's just a matter of okay, we're going to do a fiveminute pause every day, then it's not about taking care of anybody. It'sfound about actually paying attention. It's not about making the adjustmentsthat are meeted, it's just simply stopping production and that's noteffective. So as long as they're aware, O that and the people have the abilityto come to you and say hey, you know we have extremely hot and here's ourheathenness and then the the team leader has the the authorities. So,okay, at this point, we'll go another thirty minutes and everybody's taking aten minute breaking re, Hadrat Ng. And then, when you go back to that you'remaking safer decisions again, because you don't have that excess of the deedyeah, it's it, and that may be exactly what that Howe grew is doing thatthey're, making the appropriate adjustments for the environment at thetime that they're doing it and when you don't have those significance in herheat or severe cold. You know you just run as normal and take your normalbreaks, because that's there's you're not making adjustments in you're, not you're, not having to make anunnecessary adjustment, because you've already put in place safe practices forthe normal operations. That's that aspect about you know when I mentionedat the beginning about environment: it's not just it's not just theenvironment of the work team that you're on it's, not just theenvironment of your immediate leadership or your senior leadership,or even the community that you live in, because all of those will play intointo the individuala contributor the...

...individual employees preconceived notions or their culturalbeliefs. We saw that when it came to when and how masks were applied,because certain cultures were like in that and that's the same thing with, dowe really need safety, glasses. I've been doing this a hundred years. Idon't need a hard hat yeah, you do so. You know those things complain todo it as well and so, but also taken to account the physical environmentthey're in you know. That is something that we look at when it comes to theequipment they work on, but we tend to not look at it as a business about thethe actual environmental changes that can impact by the individualcontributor or the or the worker. We often ignore that you know I just goout and do your job. You know we need to give it that the production over youknow, safety, really, you know, plays a role in a lot of companies. You know,and that's one thing that I wanted to ask you about so you know you've gotsome military background. I know you have some communications background andnow you're in a specific area of manufacturing, and-and I know you have specific protocols with what you do, you know it's alittle bit different than some other types of manufacturing. What is thebiggest difference in attitudes from companies, employees in the differenttypes of industries that you've worked in when it comes to safety? What's agood question when I was with the homeland response for after NATO, I waswith her the homing response. Worse, we leased with a lot of agencies becausethat's what we did. We provided that additional support and a lot ofgovernment agencies prior agencies, health agencies, low enforcementagencies and similar to each one of those having a different idea of whatthey considered appropriate behavior, but they all the same thing in the inthe civilian realm. Communications has such a broad ray from infrastructuredevelopment, so you engineering and in Lang cables below the ground andthrowing up holes and building microwave towers to someone coming in,and you know putting table in your house so that everything from therethere's a huge array of skills and tanks working in man holes to making pharmaceuticals, especiallypharmaceuticals, that are controlled substances. Those are entirelydifferent, but everyone seems to bring with them an idea that will not everymany people initially have the idea that safety is an ad on that safety isjust an extra cost that you have to incur that we build it this way, andthis is the most efficient way to build it. But if you go in and say, okay,let's look at how you're building it? Okay, if they, if, for instance, thiswasn't something that I did. But it's something that I read, there was amanufacturing company that was building arm rests for cars, and- and this wasin a rural community in Missouri, they did it for GM productsand that's all they did. They. They molded the phone, they molded the outerrubber, and then they assembled the parts together to create the armrestsas they went through the line. They realized. People were reaching over oneline to another and they took their two weeks off over the Christmas break andthey re designed their line with industrial ergonomic specialists, sothat now people, instead of having to reach over one line together, the twoand both things coming down at the same time, they meet at one area in oneindividual or two individuals, make the inspection and put them together on theline and those down. So the people are now picking it up in front of them atwaste height assembling it and then laying it down on the line which islower and slightly to the to the front at slightly below waist tight and it'sgoing out and so they're never moving and crossing over a moving line. Thereaching up and reaching down and there's a gap of about two feet thereso as they put it in a shoot, and it goes down to that line directly totheir right, so they're never having to twist and move as they were or leanover a moving line, as they were subsequently their injury rate. Withthat people had some input on how they were doing the designs that wassuccessful. It was it was an individual that worked. The lines had said wellrather than having to then down and put it there. Won't we just build a quickshoot and they did they just built a quit shoot to the right and it allowedthem to have people on leaning stools, rather than standing. Only all day andsitting was more dangerous because of their motion, but standing on on aleaning, stool that was in addition, they gave them the ability to movedirectly in front of them without...

...having to do all the twisting they wereable to reduce twisting strains. They were able to reduce risk to catchingany of their clothing and the moving bearings and subsequently the workerson the line. Slowly asked for an increase in the lines movement becausethey were more efficient and they were getting bored, so their production wentup as well, but nice. That was where safety was allowed to make to beinvolved in the entire process and the workers were allowed to be involved inthe inciter cess. A tremendous success story, so everything that they thoughtthey were spending money on in the retooling which they thought they wouldsay. Just in Workin's camp they've course saved in work miscount that wentdown drastically, but they made up for in an increase production with fewerinjuries. Less fatigue people were able to make better decisions throughout theday because of that fewer problems with at the end of the line with C, becausepeople were spotting issues ahead of time, so it worked out very well forthem. I didn't have anything do with it, but that's exactly what we did with myprevious employment involving individuals working on the telephoneline area when it came to latter safety, in fact that that company, if I canjust run a couple of minutes into that they company head, you have to look atthe Medicata, and this is something that's very important for the safetyteam in the leadership team and you have to look at all of them at a data.So we merged two companies. They had two different ladder: Safety Protocols,one company we looked at was averaging around six and a half percent of alatter safety incident per year. When you broke it down by employee andthe other was looking in around nine percent per year, when you broke itdown my employee and they said well, we'll just dismiss this other. Buttogether we looked at at this and said: Well, wait a minute you're, justlooking at incident per employee. How many times does that employee use aladder that makes a big difference? It should be incident per employee use ofa ladder, and then we found that the ones that were running at about ninepercent Perth will ye were actually down to about point five per ladderusage and the ones that were a little over two percent per employee. Were itat around twenty six per cent for latter usage, because the ones thatthat seemed about nine percent overall were using the ladder. Eighty sevenpercent of the time they were on an extension ladder and the others were onan extension ladder. One point three percent of the time. So when wecrunched all of those numbers and looked at all of the Meta data, we realize that Oh wait a minute.There's a problem with individuals is, it is at the protocols or is it thepractice or is it the lack of experience, because you may go threeand a half months before you pick up a ladder, but this other person averageis seven tasks a day and they're using the ladder two to three times in everycask. So when you look at that Metadata that helps you hone in on what to lookat closely and when we revised the latter safety protocols and retrainedeveryone and then put into place monthly qualifications where they haveto to show it's a hands on, they have to show they know how to do it, butthat drastically reduced all of the latter act, and that was one of that.Twelve million dollar savings on work, mens come and then giving ownershipnice. It's interesting that you mentioned the ownership of it, but youhaven't mentioned you know, usage right. It would be way different. If I climbeddown a ladder, then you know the maintenance people that work on thisbuilding right. I have a much greater risk of getting injured and probablywould, if I'm trying to, because I don't knowhow to pick up a ladder. I know a lot more now because I just did lattersafety. You know with my ocean class and it's interesting because one of thethings that they pointed out was that the most industry, the most injuries,are with the young and inexperienced, and they found the trend right to youryour more seasoned workers. You know well yeah, he if it's somebody that'sbeen in the industry for a while. They move ladders every day. They know ifthey pick it up from here and they move with it in this particular manner.Their backs going to hurt tomorrow, you know and and and they're, not twenty, which I think, makes a difference. Butyou know again it's that it's the experience and the trial and error thatwe bring into things and the training right. So someone that's been aroundfor a while has had significantly more training than someone that's newer inthe industry, and so I think it's interesting. You know you have a lot ofthings incorporated in the programs, so...

...t you know with with your company. Youhave the Puri to peer support right, so you may have somebody that's brand newto the company or fairly new to the company. That's on your safetycommittee and you know part of your safety program with someone. That'sbeen more seasoned, that's been were the company longer, maybe has worked indifferent areas, and they have that level of communication, which I thinkis so cool. You Know How do you think that's made a difference. Well, I thinkthat's helped immensely, because that really solidifies that peer to peerteam work in that consideration of the other individual and that those mentorit's really a mentor program. But it's not worded that way and it's notpresented that way. It's presented as just to work together as a dean, butthey will take a mentor leadership role with those votes and- and one of theNice thing that blossoms out of that is something that we m. We were able toimplement it both places and that's that it's not the safety classes aren'tjust led by safety professionals. Those team members may be the ones that areleaving the safety training this month and a safey professional is standingback and letting them become the subject matter expert. In that you knowthey have a two weeks to prepare. They know what they're going to say and andthey know how to do it, and then everybody gets involved and they leadthe class. Well, that makes them more aware of it, and it also gives themmakes them that subject, mantras Wot, that's me and people come to them andask questions, and if you do that- and you rotate that through everyone, thenyou've developed a very robust system of people taking care of each other andtaking ownership wort and there's no better way to learn it than to have toteach it so so that has helped the mentally as well.Absolutely absolutely- and you know, the Nice thing is like, like you saidbefore with you know the individual that wasn't necessarily antiquebringing that ladder at right. So we have a lot to learn from people thatare coming into. You know an industry or a company. They may have a littlebit different of a view on how things look than US deter have been doing itfor a while or that I've worked for a company for a long time right so andyounger people. You know they come up with some really neat stuff. You knowmy children are old enough to be out of the house, but they're not they're, notthat old and they come up with some really neat things. My Future Son inlaw is, he does tile. You know, that's that's his that's what he does that'shis bright and butter, and it's interesting. You know some of thethings that I see him doing, because you know now they they video everythingand put it on Facebook, and you know, he's taking pictures of all of his work,and you know I I'll throw a little comment on there. You know to to Eryour safety, glasses and yeah. You know it. I love the idea that you know in acompany like yours, you have that pere to peer support right, so you have theseasoned, employee, teaching and giving giving lessons on a specific area, butthen you have the input of the fresh eyes so to speak and that theycommunicate and can learn from each other. So you know that's that's reallyawesome that your company does a yeah. Thank you and that that just that'ssomething that I think is one of the challenges with safety professionals.It's bringing the understanding of hey look. This is the pay out, and this ismuch more valuable for your con company than just taking class check in the boxand then you've got your ocean report that says that you're trained down justgetting that by in all the way up the the chain. Some senior managementcultures are very open to it. Others it may take a little more. He may be alittle more challenging to implement some of these things, but I think thegreater you get the individual involved, the safer. Your overall climate is thatis, you know, that's a really great way to look at it. You know, and and themore we take ownership of what we do. You know from a safety standpoint inanything we do right if we own what we do, we have more pride in it, we'remore likely to do it more successfully and- and I really like that you makethat part of your safety program so definitely Kudos to you. Wow I'velearned so much from you. I wish we had more time, but they cut us down to anhour. I could I could talk to you all day I could as well. You know I loveyour theories on Risk Assessment and it's certainly been a pleasure, sowe're going to wrap things up for today. Thank you, folks, for the SafetyManagement Show. Thank you daren for visiting us today greatly appreciateyou having here. Thank you for the invitation. It's been wonderful. Thankyou. So much folks enjoy the program, have a beautiful day and vs in need of a blue print for workplacesafety and Compliance Safety Services...

Company is North America's leadingprovider of safety, training and compliant solutions. We supply customsafety, manials and policies and on sight and online training solutionsthat will enhance the safety of your workplace and our compliance serviceswill save you time and resources guaranteeing peace of mind witheighteen years in the industry we have a proven track record of helpingcustomers achieved better safety outcomes by providing customizesolutions that fit the unique needs of each business to learn more had tosafety services. Companyon thanks for listening to the safetymanagement, show to hear more stories from safety leaders subscribe to theshow in your favorite podcast player. If you enjoyed the show, leave us arating until next time stay safe, T, T.

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